new text in MA Bibliotheque publication

My contribution ‘What did he do with his pipe?’ is included in The Graveside Orations of Karl Einstein, a new publication from Ma Bibliotheque, edited by Dale Holmes and Sharon Kivland.

At the memorial for Rosa Luxemburg on 13 June 1919, the political radical, art historian, critic, and writer Carl Einstein gave an oration. There is no record of what Einstein said, how he said it, or what it addressed. This collection assembles a broad range of texts from artists, film-makers, writers, poets, critics, philosophers, and art historians. Each contribution is a speculation on what Einstein might have delivered, each as likely and as unlikely to be Einstein’s as any other.

In my piece I present a fictional or imagined synthesis of accounts made by government or right wing spies who attempt, but fail, to record Einstein’s speech. Their observations and annotations generate a faulty record of the gestures of the speaker.

The publication is available from the Ma Bibliotheque website.

Emergency Index vol. 7

Volume 7, the latest volume of Emergency Index, “an annual document of performance practice”, has recently been published. Covering 260 works made across 51 countries through 2017, the book gives an overview of activity in live and performance art. My projects, Subject to Gesture, with Benjamin D. Duvall in Liverpool; and Tears in Rain, which was part of Plymouth Art Weekender 2017, are both documented in this publication.

The Ugly Duckling Presse website includes further information on this volume. HERE

Sound in Artists Films made in the South West

My short film work, ‘flat-head self-tapping’ (2015) made with sound artist Neil Rose will be screened as part of this event in The Gallery at Plymouth College of Art on November 7th 2018.

‘flat-head self-tapping’ engages with questions of speaking in public, of being on show, of being heard, and displaying coded behaviour. Deriving elements from Bell’s Standard Elocutionist and online dictionaries, the performance text stitches fragments, word lists, letters, and gestures into a display of awkward flapping interrupted by gnomic expulsions.

Originally presented as a live performance at Arnolfini, Bristol, this version for screen was developed with sound, video and editing by Neil Rose; the trailer is available at Vimeo here.

The screening is on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/496149960903200/

report on Projectivisms symposium in Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry

A report by Andrew Jeffrey on the symposium Projectivisms:Way-making the Contemporary Projective, University of Cardiff, May 2018 mentions my performance there of ‘threaded insert’. It is published in the Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry 10(1).

The discussion of the relationship between who is in charge in the interaction between a human being and digital technology was then exemplified by Mark Leahy’s (Independent Scholar) ‘“The threshing floor of the dance” A performance of threaded insert’. Leahy appeared in white gloves and bow tie in the centre of the room. He then put in some ear-phones and began making statements, ‘Agape, we perform’, moving forward a set number of steps, changing direction, moving again, making statements, ‘a portion of depressed hair’, describing the room, spelling out words, walking forward, spelling out words accompanied by a basic sign language, walking out of the fire escape, re-appearing through a different door. The performance with variations and repetitions lasted for twenty minutes. It turns out that Leahy was responding to various instructions played at random from MP3 files. All the contents derived from guides for ‘proper’ speech, conduct and bodily deportment. It made me think that Leahy was showing “what he is as a creature of nature (with certain instructions to carry out)”.

Jeffrey, A., (2018). Projectivisms >> Symposium Way-making the Contemporary Projective, University of Cardiff, 8th–9th May 2018. Journal of British and Irish Innovative Poetry. 10(1), p.10. DOI: http://doi.org/10.16995/biip.82

article in Performance Research 23.2: On Writing and Performance

I have an essay ‘Disrupting the Market in Echoes: Voice, body and technology in poetry and performance by Hannah Weiner and Holly Pester’ in a recent issue of Performance Research published by Taylor & Francis. The issue, On Writing and Performance, is edited by Ric Allsopp and Julieanna Preston.

This essay considers questions of writing in its relation to voice, technology and performance through a reading of voiced and printed work by Hannah Weiner and Holly Pester. The focus is on two works, Holly Pester’s ‘Buddy Holly on my Answer Machine’ published in Hoofs (2011), from if p then q books, and ‘RJ Romeo & Juliet’ from Hannah Weiner’s Code Poems: From the INTERNATIONAL CODE OF SIGNALS for the use of all nations, published in 1982. 

Link to the Journal online: doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2018.1464761