new book out from if p then q books

On 23rd September, editor James Davies of if p then q books published a new book of mine. At Sounds Like: 3 Projects brings together three texts that have elements of performance, sound and procedure. The material has been developed in different ways over some years, and parts have been presented as performance scores, within work for radio, and as visual publications. A sample of the text, more information and a link to order the book are here on the if p then q website.

visual poems in latest issue of Synapse periodical

Editor Olchar Lindsann has included 4 visual-textual pieces of mine in the latest periodical publication from monOcle-Lash Anti-Press. Synapse#5: Flashes of Language in Revolt is available now; 90 pages of varied and exciting work from 38 different contributors in a perfect-bound US-letter format.

You can order via the link on the monOcle-Lash website.

new poems for The Remix Project

Two new poems of mine have just been published by Rupert Loydell on the Stride Magazine site as part of his The Remix Project. The series, of which mine is no. 13, is a response to Rupert’s invitation “to submit a (preferably new and unpublished) short poem plus a remix of said poem” for publication. My contribution consists of two ‘square poems’, ‘A Quare Meal for a Square Dealer’, developed while working on material for the 9×9: a set of poems under constraint, and a remix of the two 81-word blocks into a set of lineated stanzas, ‘The Other Side of Money’.

essay in new issue of Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures

An essay of mine contextualising my performance ‘his voice’ has just been published online in the latest issue of the journal Hyperrhiz: New Media Cultures. Edited by Anne Karhio and Álvaro Seiça, the issue gathers proceedings of the Other Codes / Cóid Eile conference held at NUI Galway in the Summer of 2017.

From the Abstract:

Taking a route through voice and utterance and audience, by way of the body, this essay offers a contextualisation of Mark Leahy’s performance work “his voice” (2015). Following a brief overview of theorisations of “voice” and of “utterance”, the essay draws on discussions across linguistics, music and technology. Into this is folded a consideration of the processes and concerns at work within Leahy’s performance practice. […] In “his voice” the material spoken in the performance is a transposition of a sequence of tweets, harvested live from Twitter. This splitting or splicing of utterance, body and voice, is discussed, and the essay considers how it raises questions for understanding relations of the digital and utterance.

The essay can be read online at:

http://hyperrhiz.io/hyperrhiz20/interfaces/1-leahy-contextualising-his-voice.html